Pages

Rabu, 09 Desember 2020

Coronavirus Australia: Pfizer vaccine warning after allergic reactions - NEWS.com.au

The UK’s health regulators now say that anyone with a history of significant allergic reactions should not have the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid jab, after two NHS workers reacted badly to it on Tuesday.

Both workers are fine now, but they both had an  anaphylactoid reaction – which often means a skin rash, breathlessness and sometimes a drop in blood pressure – shortly after taking the new jab. The good news is that there have been no known anaphylaxis reactions, which can be fatal.

Health regulators say both NHS workers have a history of serious allergies and carry adrenaline pens around with them.

Professor Stephen Powis, medical director for the NHS in England, told the BBC that both workers were recovering well and that this type of reaction was “common with new vaccines”. He described the warning as a precautionary measure.

Tasmanian Senator Jacqui Lambie said the warning should give the Australian government pause for thought about making the vaccine mandatory.

“There are going to be the unintended consequences,” she told Today. “Whether it’s the jab might suit a lot of people, you know you will get a handful where it really has some sort of reaction on them and can actually make them quite sick.

“I think we will have to give and take with that. I salute the UK being the first ones to put their hands up and be guinea pigs. I’m concerned about saying no jab no school, that’s worrying, throwing that out there in the parents in their face, we still don’t know enough about the vaccine and haven’t watched it go through.”

Thousands of Britons became the first in the Western world to receive the vaccine on Tuesday at the start of the biggest global vaccination drive in more than half a century.

The vaccine, which proved to be 95 percent effective in late-stage clinical trials, is administered in two doses, 21 days apart. Overnight, Canada followed Britain’s lead and approved the vaccine.

Follow our live coverage below.

Live Updates

South Africa, the country most affected by the coronavirus in Africa, has entered a second wave of the pandemic, the health minister declared overnight.

“As it stands as a country we now meet that criteria,” Zweli Mkhize said in a statement, as the country registered nearly 7000 new cases in the last 24-hour cycle.

The country now counts 828,598 infections after 6709 new cases were detected between Tuesday and Wednesday.

South Africa had reined in its first wave which occurred in July at an average of 12,000 cases detected daily. Numbers then gradually came down, at a point dropping below 1000 in September.

AFP

In a further devastating blow to the cruise industry, a 'voyage to nowhere' in Singapore has been cut short after a passenger tested positive.

The voyages — starting and ending at the city-state with no stops — began last month, marking the resumption of cruises after a months-long hiatus due to travel restrictions.

But early Wednesday morning the holiday calm was shattered by an announcement the cruise was being cut short after an 83-year-old male passenger had tested positive.

“One guest aboard Quantum of the Seas tested positive for coronavirus after checking in with our medical team,” operator Royal Caribbean said in a statement.

“We identified and isolated all guests and crew who had close contact with this guest, and each of those individuals have subsequently tested negative for the virus.”

The vessel had 1,680 guests and 1,148 crew on board, and arrived early morning in the city-state after turning back on day three of a four-day cruise.

With words and picture by AFP

Victoria will stop its tough border permit system and instead “spot check” documents from South Australian residents from Saturday.

The Herald Sun reports the new road checkpoints will not be manned by authorised officers.
Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews closed the border in November after an outbreak, believed to have been started by a hotel quarantine worker.

Tasmanian Senator Jacqui Lambie said the warning about allergic reactions to the Pfizer vaccine from the UK should give the Australian government pause for thought about making jabs mandatory.

"There are going to be the unintended consequences," she told Today. "Whether it's the jab might suit a lot of people, you know you will get a handful where it really has some sort of reaction on them and can actually make them quite sick.

"I think we will have to give and take with that. I salute the UK being the first ones to put their hands up and be guinea pigs.

"I'm concerned about saying no jab no school, that's worrying, throwing that out there in the parents in their face, we still don't know enough about the vaccine and haven't watched it go through.

"I would have sat back and not said anything about that at this point in time. I tell you what, it's a Christmas gift in itself, let's hope to God it works."

The Pfizer vaccine has only started being rolled out over the last couple of days, but already authorities have had to issue a worrying warning.

The UK's health regulators now say that anyone with a history of significant allergic reactions should not have the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid jab, after two NHS workers reacted badly to it on Tuesday.

Both workers are fine now, but they both had an anaphylactoid reaction – which often means a skin rash, breathlessness and sometimes a drop in blood pressure – shortly after taking the new jab.

The good news is that there have been no known anaphylaxis reactions, which can be fatal.

Health regulators say both NHS workers have a history of serious allergies and carry adrenaline pens around with them.

Professor Stephen Powis, medical director for the NHS in England, told the BBC that both workers were recovering well and that this type of reaction was "common with new vaccines". He described the warning as a precautionary measure.

Experts have called out a "crazy" oversight in the Australia's hotel quarantine system, with fears it could put the country at risk of a fresh outbreak.

There are growing calls for Australia to adopt a national surveillance system to oversee international arrivals, rather than having the system differ between each state and territory.

An epidemiologist form the University of South Australia, Professor Adrian Esterman, told the Sydney Morning Herald that the federal government should be overseeing border control and the quarantine program across the whole country.

"Protecting Australians should be their No.1 priority and they should be totally in charge of quarantine and they aren't," he said.

"They've said to each state and territory: 'No, you take care of it.' It's just crazy because we are seeing different states and territories with a different set regulations."

University of New South Wales Professor Mary-Louise McLaws backed up these calls for a national approach to hotel quarantine, with recent failures showing the state-by-state system wasn't fool-proof.

"There are only a few hundred people flying into the country each day so it really is not that onerous to identify the names and identities of all these people coming in on national database that can then be shared with every airport in Australia," Professor McLaws told the Sydney Morning Herald.

It comes just days after a major breach at Sydney airport sparked panic when two international arrivals were allowed to skip hotel quarantine and board a plane to Melbourne.

This forced more than 100 people that came into contact with the travellers into isolation and sparked fears of dozens of new infections.

This morning a similar breach was revealed, after an aviation worker was allowed to skip quarantine and fly to Melbourne, while Victoria was battling its second wave of COVID-19 infections.

The man arrived in Sydney from San Francisco in July before taking a domestic flight into Melbourne on July 14, skipping the mandatory 14 day quarantine.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian addressed the breaches today, saying we have to "accept that human error and mistakes are going to happen".

"I cannot promise that will not happen again. But we do need to do is make sure that anyone who may have been a close contact of that person or at risk is contacted and steps need to be taken and that is what is really important," she told the ABC.

Finn McHugh, NCA NewsWire

A group of Coalition senators is demanding governments ease church restrictions for Christmas, saying it is hypocritical for sporting events to be at full capacity while worshippers are restricted.

Nationals senator Matt Canavan will put a motion to the upper house, urging the states to expand the number of people allowed to attend church services so they are "no more restrictive than those pertaining to football games".

Senator Canavan told NCA NewsWire he supported restrictions on religious gatherings when they were necessary, but with Australia bringing COVID under control successfully, the risks had since lowered.

The Nationals said religious expression was a "fundamental right", and it was vital Australians be allowed to worship on one of the Christian calendar's most important days.
Read the full story here

Let's block ads! (Why?)


https://news.google.com/__i/rss/rd/articles/CBMiqAFodHRwczovL3d3dy5uZXdzLmNvbS5hdS93b3JsZC9jb3JvbmF2aXJ1cy9hdXN0cmFsaWEvY29yb25hdmlydXMtYXVzdHJhbGlhLXBmaXplci12YWNjaW5lLXdhcm5pbmctYWZ0ZXItYWxsZXJnaWMtcmVhY3Rpb25zL2xpdmUtY292ZXJhZ2UvZWU0MjUwODgwODg1Yjk3MjNmOWRhMzE4NWZkZjYwMzfSAawBaHR0cHM6Ly93d3cubmV3cy5jb20uYXUvd29ybGQvY29yb25hdmlydXMvYXVzdHJhbGlhL2Nvcm9uYXZpcnVzLWF1c3RyYWxpYS1wZml6ZXItdmFjY2luZS13YXJuaW5nLWFmdGVyLWFsbGVyZ2ljLXJlYWN0aW9ucy9saXZlLWNvdmVyYWdlL2VlNDI1MDg4MDg4NWI5NzIzZjlkYTMxODVmZGY2MDM3L2FtcA?oc=5

2020-12-09 19:38:24Z
52781216634638

Tidak ada komentar:

Posting Komentar